Humanoid robot

Humanoid robot
Humanoid robot

Humanoid Robot

By Md iftekharul islam

A humanoid robot is a robot with its body shape built to resemble the human body. The design may be for functional purposes, such as interacting with human tools and environments, for experimental purposes, such as the study of bipedal locomotion, or for other purposes.

Humanoid robots are professional service robots built to mimic human motion and interaction. Like all service robots, they provide value by automating tasks in a way that leads to cost-savings and productivity. Humanoid robots are a relatively new form of professional service robot.The first humanoid robot? By definition of the word, Herbert Televox, was the first ever humanoid robot. Built by Ron Wensley in 1927, the sxz could lift the receiver to accept a telephone call and control simple processes by operating switches according to the signals it received.Scientists are already growing muscles, bones, and mini-organs in the lab. But these tissues are generally small, simple, and kinda wimpy. That's partly because a Petri dish is no match for the human body.

Take, for example, skeletal muscle. Bioreactors—typically warm, moist vats where cells are grown—might induce some simple movements in lab-grown muscles, but it's nothing like the multidirectional bending and stretching of the human body, which helps our muscles grow and get stronger. That's why two scientists from Oxford University are proposing that we use humanoid robots to grow engineered tissues instead. Their article was published Wednesday in Science Robotics.

"There is no better bioreactor than the human body itself," says study co-author and tissue engineer Pierre Mouthuy, "so the better we can copy that environment, the better our chances to obtain functional engineered tissues are going to be."

Robots like Kenshiro and Eccerobot replicate human anatomy in intricate detail, and the authors write that we might be able to use them to grow better tissue grafts that can be transplanted into ailing humans.For tendons, ligaments, bone, and cartilage, humanoid robots could simulate lifelike architecture and movements of various types and directions. This could help more cells to develop and differentiate into complex tissues.

What might these bioreactors look like? Perhaps scientists could immerse the robotic body parts in a bioreactor's nutrient broth—but then you risk corroding the machine's metals or ruining its electronics, says Mouthuy. Another solution may be to encase the engineered tissue in a membrane or artificial skin, so that the developing tissue can have all the moisture and nutrients it needs, while the robot stays dry. Mouthuy and study co-author Andrew Carr are already working on some prototypes, and hope to soon find out whether the humanoid bioreactor concept is actually feasible.

If they work, humanoid bioreactors might eventually be able to nurture more complex tissues and organs, such as lab-grown hearts. Plus, they might lead to robots that are safer for humans to be around, the authors note, as well as other robots advances—such as "biohybrid humanoids," whose movements are controlled by cells instead of machinery.

Humanoid robots are professional service robots built to mimic human motion and interaction. Like all service robots, they provide value by automating tasks in a way that leads to cost-savings and productivity. Humanoid robots are a relatively new form of professional service robot. While long-dreamt about, they’re now starting to become commercially viable in a wide range of applications.

The humanoid robots market is poised for signficant growth. It’s projected the market for humanoid robots will be valued at $3.9 Billion in 2023, growing at a staggering 52.1% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) between 2017 and 20231. Of all the types of humanoid robots, bipedal robots are expected to grow at the fastest CAGR during the forecasted period. The rapid expansion of the humanoid robots market is due primarily to the quickly improving capabilities of these robots and their viability in an ever-widening range of applications.

Humanoid robots are being used in the inspection, maintenance and disaster response at power plants to relieve human workers of laborious and dangerous tasks. Similarly, they’re prepared to take over routine tasks for astronauts in space travel. Other diverse applications include providing companionship for the elderly and sick, acting as a guide and interacting with customers in the role of receptionist, and potentially even being a host for the growth of human transplant organs.

There’s a wide range of tasks a humanoid robot can automate, from dangerous rescues to compassionate care. The ways in which these robots are deployed are constantly expanding, and as the underlying technology improves, the market will follow suit.

robots will replace humans for many jobs, just as innovative farming equipment replaced humans and horses during the industrial revolution. Factory floors deploy robots that are increasingly driven by machine learning algorithms such that they can adjust to people working alongside them.so we should pay more attention and research work for humanoid robot.

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